Beastie Boys The Mix Up

It’s a little bit Monty Python meets high school art project meets one man band. Bill McMullen’s artwork fits perfectly with this eclectic album of funkly sounds and beats.

When you flip the cover over you also get the flipped view of the musical machine. Even the bands name is flipped. It’s a nice subtle touch.

Beastie Boys: The Mix Up Back

The inside of the case is another illustration of a studio set-up with little people running about.

Beastie Boys: The Mix Up Inside

The inclusion of the band photo seems a little last minute but hey they’re in costume so who cares. I expected to see this animated on the Beastie Boys website but alas no. I love the sock monkey on the grinder.

This album is great for chillin’ out at home on your bean bag or for inclusion into your “work safe” mix for the office stereo.

Update: David & Chemical Orphan pointed out that Pink Floyd’s “Relics” may have been the inspiration for the album.

Here’s the original 1971 version illustrated by drummer Nick Mason.

Relics Pink Flyod Illustration

And the 1996 reissue design by former Hipgnosis partner Storm Thorgerson. Who for my money is the only guy who could fight Peter Saville in a CD cover design boxing match.

Relics Pink Flyod Photo

Beastie Boys: The Mix Up

Beastie Boys The Mix Up

It’s a little bit Monty Python meets high school art project meets one man band. Bill McMullen’s artwork fits perfectly with this eclectic album of funkly sounds and beats.

When you flip the cover over you also get the flipped view of the musical machine. Even the bands name is flipped. It’s a nice subtle touch.

Beastie Boys: The Mix Up Back

The inside of the case is another illustration of a studio set-up with little people running about.

Beastie Boys: The Mix Up Inside

The inclusion of the band photo seems a little last minute but hey they’re in costume so who cares. I expected to see this animated on the Beastie Boys website but alas no. I love the sock monkey on the grinder.

This album is great for chillin’ out at home on your bean bag or for inclusion into your “work safe” mix for the office stereo.

Update: David & Chemical Orphan pointed out that Pink Floyd’s “Relics” may have been the inspiration for the album.

Here’s the original 1971 version illustrated by drummer Nick Mason.

Relics Pink Flyod Illustration

And the 1996 reissue design by former Hipgnosis partner Storm Thorgerson. Who for my money is the only guy who could fight Peter Saville in a CD cover design boxing match.

Relics Pink Flyod Photo





6 Comments

  1. This cover instantly reminded me of Pink Floyd Relics album cover. http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000002U0D.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

  2. Design and illustration by regular Beastie Boys collaborator Bill McMullen
    http://www.billmcmullen.com

  3. hey David,

    I’ve never seen that cover. It’s quite nice itself. Will have to add that to the “to post” list.

  4. @Ash: The original “Relics” cover is actually closer to the execution of the Beastie Boys’

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relics_(Pink_Floyd_album)

  5. The actual inspiration for this album art is the cover of “The Amazing New Electronic Pop Sound of Jean Jacques Perrey”. Check it out here:

    http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:aifixquhld6e

    Perrey was a Moog pioneer, and the Beasties are often-professed avid fans of Moog music. In fact the cover of Perrey’s 1966 collaboration with Gershon Kingsley “The Out Side From Way In!” inspired not only the cover art for the Beasties’ other all-instrumental album, but its title as well.

  6. http://www.whatsupbuenosaires.com/wuba2/usr_files/music/Dona_Maria–i01_63.jpg

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