Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons

Lemon Jelly never put text on the covers of their albums in order to prioritize the artwork. It’s amazing how the absence of type changes a CD covers design. It immediately feels more collectible and arty. Again shrink wrapped plastic with a sticker showing the bands name was used in record stores.

Lost Horizons is probably the most artistic of their releases, their previous releases were very abstract and pattern like. It wasn’t until viewing the artwork up close did I realize it was a 3D illustration. The trees while very crude work stylistically.

Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons inside
Upon opening up this six-panel digi pack you get to see the illustration in all it’s glory. Flip it over and you get the countryside at night with the city shining and the country dark. All packaged in a nice card 6 panel digipack.

Fred Deakin the design is also half of Lemon Jelly and runs all the bands design and motion work through his company Airside. It’s this dual role that allows complete control over the bands image while still experimenting. He also joins the long list of musicians/designers working today.

Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons

Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons

Lemon Jelly never put text on the covers of their albums in order to prioritize the artwork. It’s amazing how the absence of type changes a CD covers design. It immediately feels more collectible and arty. Again shrink wrapped plastic with a sticker showing the bands name was used in record stores.

Lost Horizons is probably the most artistic of their releases, their previous releases were very abstract and pattern like. It wasn’t until viewing the artwork up close did I realize it was a 3D illustration. The trees while very crude work stylistically.

Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons inside
Upon opening up this six-panel digi pack you get to see the illustration in all it’s glory. Flip it over and you get the countryside at night with the city shining and the country dark. All packaged in a nice card 6 panel digipack.

Fred Deakin the design is also half of Lemon Jelly and runs all the bands design and motion work through his company Airside. It’s this dual role that allows complete control over the bands image while still experimenting. He also joins the long list of musicians/designers working today.





5 Comments

  1. I can remember seeing this cover in iTunes. Even though I’m not really into the band, I couldn’t help but click on the link to take a better look at the CD sleeve illustration. That’s what great illustration does – moves you, and grabs your attention. As a designer, I know great design work when I see it…I love the inside of the cover, it’s some truely original stuff…

  2. I adore this album cover, I’m a big fan of Lemon Jelly but I’m yet to buy this album. I may try and get a copy next week, now I think of it. Anyway, it’s albums that this which remind me that one of the best things about buying CDs instead of downloading is getting the artwork with it, something that downloading will never provide quite as well on a tiny iPod picture.

  3. Reminds me of M.C.Escher’s Day and Night:
    http://www.nga.gov/fcgi-bin/timage_f?object=54213&image=13362&c=ggescher

    Lemon Jelly is Yummy :)

  4. At http://www.lemonjelly.ky you can download a screensaver of this cover, nicely changing from day to night etc. So you can adore all the in-betweens, as it were. Both for PC and Mac, various resolutions. Free.

  5. Listening to the album right now. It suits the music perfect: a mix of natural elements and colours with Modern technology. On the inside sleeve you see parts of this scene from different angles/perspectives and it’s really fun to where they are on the main picture. I can’t imagine animating all of this.

Post a Comment
*Required
*Required (Never published)