New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call

We posted four black covers in a row so I thought it nice for a lighter change.

What I liked about this simple execution was it’s periodic table feel. I guess New Order have influenced so man other bands they are part of the musical building blocks. (Deep I know)

It’d actually be interesting to plot the influential bands of the last 50 years on a periodic table. Note to self for that one.

The back of the CD booklet reversed the design. Although the N isn’t flipped for some reason.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Back

They also released promo versions of the CD and the Jet Stream single using a single letter this time.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Promo Covers

What I found weird while researching this was that the 7″ albums took an entirely different artistic approach. I guess Peter and the guys at Saville Associates got bored with just Helvectica Neue?

The vinyl singles have a series of photos of a naked women in a river with varying degrees of blur, which seems to be another trait of New Order’s visual style.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Vinyl

And they all came in this simple fold out vinyl holder.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Vinyl Booklet

The image is actually an Eliot Elisofon photo of a naked Tahitian as she sits in a river and places a flower in her hair, Tahiti, French Polynesia, 1954.

Tahitian women Eliot Elisofon

That’s Getty’s description. I’m guessing the image is meant to invoke a feeling that she is a siren of the sea?

Eliot’s work is all over Getty as he used to shoot for Life magazine back in the 50s. This image was part of a series from an article in Life from their Jan 1955 issue.

Life Cover 1955

While definitely not their most famous album cover, it is the most graphically simple and they certainly would have saved on printing costs :)

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens' Call

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call

We posted four black covers in a row so I thought it nice for a lighter change.

What I liked about this simple execution was it’s periodic table feel. I guess New Order have influenced so man other bands they are part of the musical building blocks. (Deep I know)

It’d actually be interesting to plot the influential bands of the last 50 years on a periodic table. Note to self for that one.

The back of the CD booklet reversed the design. Although the N isn’t flipped for some reason.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Back

They also released promo versions of the CD and the Jet Stream single using a single letter this time.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Promo Covers

What I found weird while researching this was that the 7″ albums took an entirely different artistic approach. I guess Peter and the guys at Saville Associates got bored with just Helvectica Neue?

The vinyl singles have a series of photos of a naked women in a river with varying degrees of blur, which seems to be another trait of New Order’s visual style.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Vinyl

And they all came in this simple fold out vinyl holder.

New Order: Waiting for the Sirens’ Call Vinyl Booklet

The image is actually an Eliot Elisofon photo of a naked Tahitian as she sits in a river and places a flower in her hair, Tahiti, French Polynesia, 1954.

Tahitian women Eliot Elisofon

That’s Getty’s description. I’m guessing the image is meant to invoke a feeling that she is a siren of the sea?

Eliot’s work is all over Getty as he used to shoot for Life magazine back in the 50s. This image was part of a series from an article in Life from their Jan 1955 issue.

Life Cover 1955

While definitely not their most famous album cover, it is the most graphically simple and they certainly would have saved on printing costs :)





9 Comments

  1. Im amazed Saville still has it in him, and his style fully intaked. What a legend!

  2. What I have found interesting about the NO design, is that Neville Brody has designed Hard-Fi’s new album utilising the SAME type of graphical style – just using text as in-your-face as possible. I think it;s amazing how simple typography can gain so much visual momentum in the viewers’ eye. Pribably why he used it again…

  3. This might sound s bit w*nky but…

    I am one of the founders of LongLunch (www.longlunch.com) which is a design talks forum kinda thing in Scotland. Anyway…

    We had Peter Saville up to do a talk (really really nice guy) and he commented on this piece for New Order. As I remember it he said:

    ‘This is what I said when the guys (New Order) called me up and asked me to do another cover for them.’

    I still think that is quite funny. It goes without saying Mr Saville is a great great designer.

  4. I don’t like how Saville works with Photoshop filters, but in terms of concepts and ideas he’s the man!

  5. Thought you might like this… I interviewed Peter Saville for MOJO magazine about the JD/NO covers and he said that he wasn’t really involved in Waiting For The Siren’s Call – he delegated it to Howard Wakefield of PSA. So Rufus’s story is spot on…

    Here’s some of the interview that didn’t get published for ya – amazing to think what the cover would have been like if he’d got his own way…

    “[Doing the new New Order cover] is like family, so it is like going home for Christmas. I think the same thing applies on both sides. The situation that was crystallising around Get Ready is now an impenetrable force [ie Bernard Sumner wasn't keen on any of PS's ideas]. So I stepped down from the new cover. I’ve left Christmas lunch before the pudding. I didn’t have anything to suggest, nor did they. So it’s Bernard’s cover. I’ve played a part in certain meetings, but things have now happened which have no connection with me whatsoever. Bernard is doing the cover and Howard is looking after it.

    One of the things I wanted to do with the new album was to reconstruct Power Corruption And Lies – I wanted to redo the flowers, but I wanted to do it with real flowers. I wanted to make that bunch of roses and shoot it. I wanted to refabricate New Order. I wanted to quote this moment from history – my history and their history and the commodity’s history, which is – you could say – relevant to their music now.

    The other idea was that I sign so many covers now, at lectures and exhibitions, people turn up with things to sign. And whenever I sit down, I think, I didn’t leave anywhere to sign when I was designing it. I said to my girlfriend, the next fucking New Order cover I’m going to do is going to have a signing space on it! And that was my idea for the cover – there would be a cover and I would sign it. Bernard was just flabbergasted about that.”

    Power Corruption And Lies with real flowers? How post-modern is that?

  6. Great site.

    My recollection from around the time of the album’s release was that the single image of the woman was to be the album cover image but someone somewhere at the record company got cold feet after the Boxing Day tsunami disaster, hence the nondescript “No” image we got instead. I’m as baffled as you probably are.

  7. … you may be interested to know that this is not the first sleeve Bernard has designed : he lead the designs for “Unknown Pleasures” and “Get Ready”. The Saville design originally proposed became the ‘opaque’ 7″ sleeve, and was hastily shelved a few days before it went to print following the Boxing Day tsunami disaster. The current design is interesting as it reflects a ‘negative’ of the first New order LP “Movement”

  8. The best thing about this cover was the effect on the shelves of record shops when it first came out.

    I was in HMV and amongst all the CD covers and Photoshop-happy DVDs was this series just saying No No No No No No No along the rack.

  9. I actually made a “periodic table of music genres” a few years ago, you should totally check it out.

    http://dj-glass.deviantart.com/art/Periodic-Table-of-Music-Genres-12372231

    And by the way, sleevage is like, my favorite new site! I’ve spent so much time here, it’s really nice to see album design get such great respect and analysis.

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