You Am I: Dilettantes

Here’s a first. The artwork for an album that hasn’t even hit the shelves (yep, that makes this a premiere). You Am I’s eighth studio album “Dilettantes” has some stunning high contrast illustrated artwork courtesy of Ken Taylor, who has previously worked on artwork for Tim Rogers, amongst a long prestigious list of other international and local rock icons. But more on that later.

Right now we’re lucky enough to have the first glimpses of artwork for the new album, plus a preview of the album itself (scroll down for full length streams of the tracks ‘Erasmus’ and ‘Dilettantes’), plus an interview with the band conducted by the way-too-cool Symon Parnell from Under Oath Magazine.

Ken Taylor, on Art Deco
Tim and the band were really into the art of Aubrey Beardsley, as I was too, and all of us essentially thought that this kind of classic look would fit the album really well. I wanted to maintain a hand crafted aesthetic throughout the piece so I decided that everything must be drawn in ink and the type needed to be all hand drawn as it would of back then. they were really into the art that was done for a lot of the Oscar Wilde plays which also had a very hands on feel to it.

On fonts
The font as I mentioned above is actually all hand drawn. it references old style fonts of that era. I based some of the forms on readily available fonts such as desdemona but added more authentic touches to it.

On inspiration
The artwork unashamedly references the style of Aubrey Beardsley and although it has all been redrawn and is an original artwork I was drawing it all with a bunch of his old stuff in front of me at the time.

On the front cover illustration
The image for the front is original. The idea was for a jaded dilettante – reading over her artists works with tears running down her face. I decided to place the lyre bird in there for compositions sake more so than anything else – I just kinda thought it would look cool. the peacock pattern under her dress though is a direct nod to Beardsley though.

On colour
Tim really liked a piece of old artwork where this had been done and I am a sucker for old Japanese woodcut prints so it just came from there. It was always going to be a simple classic colour scheme from the very beginning.

On direction from the band
As I mentioned above it was kind of a group thing. They were all lovely to deal with and had a very strong direction in mind from the beginning

On the decision to use an illustration over a band photo
The album was always going to be quite a different sound for the band and You Am I have in the past often gone with a photo. if not of themselves, of something else. They wanted the artwork to look different from anything they had done it the past.

It was a very tight timeline (surprise surprise!) and they new what they wanted. I sent through the original sketch (below) and it was approved straight away and I just went on my merry way from there.

You Am I: Dilettantes: Rough Sketch
You Am I: Dilettantes: Rough Sketch

You Am I: Dilettantes: Detailed Sketch
You Am I: Dilettantes: Detailed Sketch

Inside sleeves
Andy
You Am I: Andy: Dilettante

Davey
You Am I: Davey: Dilettante

Rusty
You Am I: Rusty: Dilettante

Tim
You Am I: Tim: Dilettante

You Am I: Dilettantes: Back
You Am I: Dilettantes: Back

You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread
You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread

You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread
You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread 2

Only a couple of weeks ago You Am I were in the studio finishing up some final work on Dilettantes, & our mate Symon at Under Oath Magazine: The Indie Alternative found some time to catch up and chat about Dilettantes, and the recording process. We love it, and are sure you will as well…

Genius! But wait, there’s more!

Sleevage has 2 brand-spankin’-new You Am I songs for your listening pleasure, complete with an excerpt from Tim Rogers, just press play.

Erasmus

“I Like this kid. He’s been given the name of a 16th century philosopher, steadfastly ignores his physical shortcomings in the face of the desires of the flesh and digs the Pretenders and Van Halen. he’s got a plan to win the heart of a young lady, and just ain’t gonna hear no. Could be the stirrings of a reciprocal restraining order I hear, but he’s a good kid, although the aforementioned lady’s current boyfriend? His arse is grass.”

Dilettantes

“I first loved the word after hearing Duke Ellington use it to describe the members of his consistently brilliant bands. The meaning of the term has a duality- either referring to folks who dabble in appreciation of arts of culture, of those who have a deep love for works, or performers. On returning from a funeral of a recent acquaintance who was as charming as he was caustic, I was left, again, musing on the deep joy and befuddlement I’ve experienced in the company of a friends legacy. More often than not, the people who have left the deepest impressions on me have been those who have delicately bashed my ears with their love of music, art, literature, and with no airs and graces, more peanuts and beer. Ad somewhere up there is a BBQ I wanna be part of, ever serving the drinks. some day.”

You Am I: Dilettantes

You Am I: Dilettantes

Here’s a first. The artwork for an album that hasn’t even hit the shelves (yep, that makes this a premiere). You Am I’s eighth studio album “Dilettantes” has some stunning high contrast illustrated artwork courtesy of Ken Taylor, who has previously worked on artwork for Tim Rogers, amongst a long prestigious list of other international and local rock icons. But more on that later.

Right now we’re lucky enough to have the first glimpses of artwork for the new album, plus a preview of the album itself (scroll down for full length streams of the tracks ‘Erasmus’ and ‘Dilettantes’), plus an interview with the band conducted by the way-too-cool Symon Parnell from Under Oath Magazine.

Ken Taylor, on Art Deco
Tim and the band were really into the art of Aubrey Beardsley, as I was too, and all of us essentially thought that this kind of classic look would fit the album really well. I wanted to maintain a hand crafted aesthetic throughout the piece so I decided that everything must be drawn in ink and the type needed to be all hand drawn as it would of back then. they were really into the art that was done for a lot of the Oscar Wilde plays which also had a very hands on feel to it.

On fonts
The font as I mentioned above is actually all hand drawn. it references old style fonts of that era. I based some of the forms on readily available fonts such as desdemona but added more authentic touches to it.

On inspiration
The artwork unashamedly references the style of Aubrey Beardsley and although it has all been redrawn and is an original artwork I was drawing it all with a bunch of his old stuff in front of me at the time.

On the front cover illustration
The image for the front is original. The idea was for a jaded dilettante – reading over her artists works with tears running down her face. I decided to place the lyre bird in there for compositions sake more so than anything else – I just kinda thought it would look cool. the peacock pattern under her dress though is a direct nod to Beardsley though.

On colour
Tim really liked a piece of old artwork where this had been done and I am a sucker for old Japanese woodcut prints so it just came from there. It was always going to be a simple classic colour scheme from the very beginning.

On direction from the band
As I mentioned above it was kind of a group thing. They were all lovely to deal with and had a very strong direction in mind from the beginning

On the decision to use an illustration over a band photo
The album was always going to be quite a different sound for the band and You Am I have in the past often gone with a photo. if not of themselves, of something else. They wanted the artwork to look different from anything they had done it the past.

It was a very tight timeline (surprise surprise!) and they new what they wanted. I sent through the original sketch (below) and it was approved straight away and I just went on my merry way from there.

You Am I: Dilettantes: Rough Sketch
You Am I: Dilettantes: Rough Sketch

You Am I: Dilettantes: Detailed Sketch
You Am I: Dilettantes: Detailed Sketch

Inside sleeves
Andy
You Am I: Andy: Dilettante

Davey
You Am I: Davey: Dilettante

Rusty
You Am I: Rusty: Dilettante

Tim
You Am I: Tim: Dilettante

You Am I: Dilettantes: Back
You Am I: Dilettantes: Back

You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread
You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread

You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread
You Am I: Dilettantes: Spread 2

Only a couple of weeks ago You Am I were in the studio finishing up some final work on Dilettantes, & our mate Symon at Under Oath Magazine: The Indie Alternative found some time to catch up and chat about Dilettantes, and the recording process. We love it, and are sure you will as well…

Genius! But wait, there’s more!

Sleevage has 2 brand-spankin’-new You Am I songs for your listening pleasure, complete with an excerpt from Tim Rogers, just press play.

Erasmus

“I Like this kid. He’s been given the name of a 16th century philosopher, steadfastly ignores his physical shortcomings in the face of the desires of the flesh and digs the Pretenders and Van Halen. he’s got a plan to win the heart of a young lady, and just ain’t gonna hear no. Could be the stirrings of a reciprocal restraining order I hear, but he’s a good kid, although the aforementioned lady’s current boyfriend? His arse is grass.”

Dilettantes

“I first loved the word after hearing Duke Ellington use it to describe the members of his consistently brilliant bands. The meaning of the term has a duality- either referring to folks who dabble in appreciation of arts of culture, of those who have a deep love for works, or performers. On returning from a funeral of a recent acquaintance who was as charming as he was caustic, I was left, again, musing on the deep joy and befuddlement I’ve experienced in the company of a friends legacy. More often than not, the people who have left the deepest impressions on me have been those who have delicately bashed my ears with their love of music, art, literature, and with no airs and graces, more peanuts and beer. Ad somewhere up there is a BBQ I wanna be part of, ever serving the drinks. some day.”





20 Comments

  1. Very cool to see the complete artwork prior to an album coming out . It definitely gives me an idea about what the sound will be…I'm not sure if that helps or hinders the listening experience yet.

  2. The artwork is beautiful, but surely it should be Russell Keith, not Russel Kieth …

  3. Apologies for that, fixed now

  4. Nice one, properly beautiful artwork and a proper homage as opposed to a direct rip as many art directors / designers are guilty of these days…

  5. Cheers mate!

  6. I reckon the image Tim had in mind was the classic Beardsley 'Isolde', of the lone woman drinking with the red background.
    In the Beardsley she is drinking a love potion, but it could be seen as a simple of the alcoholic who drinks alone.

    A younger band used that image on their EP a couple of years ago –
    I will look and find their name – QLD?

  7. woooooo.
    your super awesome(Y)(Y)

    ilieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.
    xo

  8. I meant symbol, not simple…

  9. this cover is pretty rad…..
    the red and black looks cool
    yeah….

  10. The cover looks pretty cool and the colours go really well together. The lady looks really good.

  11. looks cool but i like things that are colourful!

  12. Very good artwork, intricate yet simple. The colour of the red definately gives it a good effect.

  13. I like the picture of the lady, but i think it need more colour, but i guess they weren't going for that 'colourful' look.

  14. the art work being represents the classicness of the band with a hug amount of mondernism.
    simliar to the band.

    the way all the drawings come together as a whole themed sort of thing is appealing and ties it all in:)

    thanks.

  15. the lady is kind of creepy but other than that it looks kind of cool. i like the red and black theme on the cover. i also like the lady's dress with all the pattens on because are really cool.

  16. I love how the design on her dress matches the background. The picture really stands out with the red background.

  17. good job ol boy! finally some class be giveth to these scallywags, if only they could conjure some to their appearance and manner! my little sisters next favourite album.

  18. I hate to be that guy making annoying corrections, but with Beardsley you mean Art Nouveau, not Art Deco. Art Nouveau flourished in the 1890s-1910, and the generally accepted starting point for Art Deco is 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs in France. The confusion is understandable though, because there are some branches of Art Deco that overlap with Art Nouveau in mood and content. Again apologies, and sorry if this pedantic.

  19. Great cover – I'm really impressed

  20. Great cover – I'm really impressed

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